Lombardy Food and Recipes – delicious and lombard

Lombardy Food and Recipes is an excerpt from the book “Milan and the Lakes
Lombardy Food and Recipes
Panettone

Lombardy Food and Recipes: A bit of historical curiosity of Lombardia food

If you’ve ever traveled through Lombardy, you may have noticed the dominant presence of the color yellow that’s used in restaurants.

This is not a coincidence. It’s a custom that dates back to medieval times when the courts would coat their food with gold before serving it to guests.

Gold was widely believed to be the remedy for illness and promised good health. Food was also prepared in this fashion for the sake of pure decadence.

As gold became increasingly valuable, the Lombardians looked for ways to create the same effect without the cost of using gold.

The golden hue of saffron risotto is one reminder of this tradition.

Pasticceria Marchesi

Since 1824 the original Marchesi pasticceria (pastry shop) has been charming customers with its refined 20th-century features and picture-perfect petit fours. Indulge your sweet tooth with any number of bigness (cream puffs), pralines, sugared almonds, and fruit gels, and sample some of the best panettoni in Milan. The dining area out back also makes for an elegant pit stop. Their artisan panettone is of superior quality.

Cooking in Milan

Milan is where they cook with butter. The city gives its name to several dishes: minestrone Alla Milanese, a soup of green vegetables, rice and bacon; risotto Alla Milanese, rice cooked with saffron; cotoletta alla milanese, (Milanese Veal Cutlet) a fillet of veal fried in egg and bread-crumbs with cheese; ossobuco, a knuckle of veal with the marrow-bone; panettone, a large fruit cake containing raisins and candied lemon peel.

The specialty of Lombardy Food and Recipes

The famous Risotto Alla Milanese gets its golden hue from the precious spice saffron. Legend has it that the dish came about when a Milanese painter decided to gild the risotto served at his wedding banquet with a harmless gold-colored dye. In Milan, they traditionally serve Risotto Alla Milanese with ossobuco (braised veal shank).

Traditionally made with raisins and candied citron, or with a creamy cream filling, the light, fluffy brioche-like bread called panettone may be tall or short, covered with chocolate or flavored with various liquors, but it’s always a symbol of the Christmas season.

With its hallmark domed shape, panettone graced Christmas tables in Milan since at least the 15th-century. Common knowledge claims its invention is from Milan. It is the most famous Christmas Lombardia food.

The traditional recipe calls for using nothing but white wheat flour, sugar, top-quality butter, eggs, and sultana raisins. Efforts are currently underway to establish guidelines for ingredients and procedures that will serve as the basis for obtaining a special DOP (Protected Designation of Origin) certification from the European Union.

This will safeguard tradition and ensure a panettone made in the time-honored, non-industrial manner,

Lombardia Wine

Few wines are produced, apart from those of Valtellina, Franciacorta or the Pavia district.

Lombardia Cheese

Cheese is very important In Lombardia food. Taleggio has its name from a valley in the province of Bergamo, but they produce it throughout Lombardia. This is a soft, creamy cow’s milk cheese that can be dated to a thousand years ago. It traditionally ripened in underground caves. Today, it matures in climate-controlled cellars.

Taleggio has a mild, somewhat acidic flavor. Its subtle aroma makes it ideal for many traditional Lombard dishes. In other parts of Italy, they use it too in scores of recipes. Because it melts quickly, Taleggio is excellent in omelets and crepes, or, as the base for a creamy pasta sauce.

In Lombardy, the commonest cheese is again the excellent Gorgonzola.

Lombardia Salami
Visit Cremona in one Day – Stradivarius violin
Other specialties of Lombardy Food and Recipes

Another traditional Lombardia food is the Mostarda di Cremona, from the inland port city of Cremona on the River Po, and the birthplace of violin master Antonio Stradivarius, consisting of candied fruits, such as cherries, figs, and pears, preserved in a mixture of sugar syrup and white mustard.

The result is a tangy condiment that is served with bollito misto, boiled, meat, game, or poultry.

Mostarda di Cremona is today mostly produced commercially, with stewed fruits instead of candied fruits, and lacks the “heat” of the traditional preparation.

Valtellina, The Cuisine

Valtellina is a land of ancient flavors. The authentic country cuisine of the Valtellina, like the natural environment in which it originates, is unique among Lombardia food.

It presents dishes that are much appreciated by the most demanding palates: “pizzoccheri”, “sciatt”, “polenta taragna”, made with buck wheat flour, “brisaola” or “bresaola”, a type of dry salt beef typical of Valtellina, the unsurpassed quality of which is due to delicate preparation and perfect curing in unique environmental conditions.

Also, the “Bitto” cheese, which bears the DOP (protected denomination of origin) mark and “bisciola”, a rustic cake containing walnuts, figs, and raisins.

Lombardy Food and Recipes
Ossobuco con risotto
RISOTTO, OSSOBUCO & TIRAMISU’ evening cooking class

Learn to cook traditional Milanese risotto with saffron, veal shanks and tiramisù in a central district in Milan (CityLife – M5 Tre Torri). During this 3-hrs cooking class, held in English in a private home in a small group, you will experience a real Italian kitchen and learn how to cook a 3-course Italian meal with a certified Italian chef & sommelier and first-class local organic ingredients. Then, savor the fruits of your labor over dinner with fellow foodies from all over the world.

Milan and Lombardy, The Food and Recipes

Agnoli in brodo – Broth agnolotti
Amaretti – Almond Cookies
Bollito misto – Boiled dinner
Busecca – Tripe Soup
Cappone con le noci – Capon with Walnuts
Casonsei – Ravioli filled with sausage, bread and cheese dressed with butter and Grana Padano.
Cassoeula – Pork Rib and Sausage Stew
Colomba pasquale – Easter Dove
Cotoletta alla Milanese – Milanese Veal Cutlets – Veal Chop Milanese Style – Milanese Veal Wiener Schnizel
Erbazzone or scarpazzone Savory Pie with Chards
Insalata di riso novarese Rice Salad Novarese Style
Lepre in salmi’ – Hare in Salmi’ Lombard Style
Luccio in salsa – Salsa pike
Lumache al burro d’erbe – Herb butter snails
Mostarda di frutta – Fruit Mustard
Mostarda di Cremona – Cremona Mustard
Nervetti in insalata – Calf’s Foot and Veal Shank Salad
Ossobuco con gremolata Ossobuco with Gremolata
Ossobuco alla milanese – Milanese Veal Shank
Pan de mei – Sweet Corn Buns
Panettone – Panettone
Panettone Ripieno – Stuffed Panettone
Polenta e osei – Polenta with skewered meats
Polenta pasticciata – Cooked cornmeal, sliced and baked with layers of tomato, pork, and mushroom sauce.
Rane in guazzetto – frogs cooked with butter, onions, garlic, tomato, white wine.
Riso al salto – Crispy Rice Patty
Riso in cagnone – Rice with Sage and Parmigiano
Risotto alla certosina – rice braised with onions, peas, leeks and tomatoes, served with froglegs, filets of perch, crayfish and mushrooms.
Risotto alla milanese – Milanese Risotto
Risotto con la zucca – Squash Risotto
Salsa Verde – Greene sauce
Sbrisolona – Crumbly Cake
Stufato (“Rustisciada”) – Mixed Stewed Meat with Onions
Tacchina ripiena – Christmas roast turkey stuffed with chestnuts, apples, pears, walnuts, minced veal, salt pork, brandy, and herbs.
Torrone – Nougat
Torta paradiso – Angel Cake
Tortelli di zucca Mantovani – Mantua pumping ravioli
Uccelli scappati chunks of veal and pork skewered with sage leaves and cooked to resemble “escaped birds.”
Vitello tonnato thin slices of roast or braised veal served cold with a creamy sauce (or mayonnaise) flavored with tuna, capers, anchovy and lemon, though recipes vary.
Zuppa pavese – Egg and Bread Soup

Valtellina houses – AdobeStock_158226185

From the northern end of Lake Como, the Valtellina cuts a broad swathe of a valley (at whose centre runs the Adda river) eastward between the Swiss mountain frontier to the north and the Orobie Alps to the south. Much of its steep northern flank is carpeted by the vineyards (mostly the Nebbiolo grape variety) that produce such coveted drops as Sforzato (Sfurzat). You can largely skip the valley towns, but a detour to the hillside wine villages is worthwhile. Two points of reference are Ponte, 8km east of Sondrio, and Teglio (with a cute Romanesque church), 8km further east. The brisk climb up among the vineyards affords sweeping views across the valley. And what better way to taste Valtellina reds than by calling into any local trattoria?

  Valtellina Recipes:

Pasticcio di pizzoccheri – Pizzocheri with Cabbage and Cheese
Pizzoccheri
Bresaola

William Dellorusso
Lombardia in Cucina: The Flavours of Lombardy

Milan-style risotto, pizzoccheri Valtellinesi, and pumpkin tortelli to start; casoeula, Milan-style cutlets, frogs stewed in tomato to follow, and to send, a slice of sbrisolona cake or panettone.
Lombardy surprises with the richness of its culinary traditions and natural ingredients, which modernity has barely affected.
"Milano in Cucina" captures this kaleidoscope of flavours, with contributions from some of the most celebrated chefs on the culinary scene, who pay homage to their territory, and whose skill is able to present a modern vision in keeping with the region's progressive spirit.

The Italian Academy of Cuisine
La Cucina: The Regional Cooking of Italy

Fifty years ago, a group of Italian scholars gathered to discuss a problem: how to preserve traditional Italian cooking. They formed the Italian Academy of Cuisine to document classic recipes from every region. The academy’s more than seven thousand associates spread out to villages everywhere, interviewing grandmothers and farmers at their stoves, transcribing their recipes—many of which had never been documented before. This is the culmination of that research, an astounding feat—2,000 recipes that represent the patrimony of Italian country cooking. Each recipe is labeled with its region of origin, and it’s not just the ingredients but also the techniques that change with the geography. Sprinkled throughout are historical recipes that provide fascinating views into the folk culture of the past. There are no fancy flourishes here, and no shortcuts; this is true salt-of-the-earth cooking. The book is an excellent everyday source for easily achievable recipes, with such simple dishes as White Bean and Escarole Soup, Polenta with Tomato Sauce, and Chicken with Lemon and Capers. For ease of use there are four different indexes. La Cucina is an essential reference for every cook’s library.

Milano in Cucina: The Flavours of Milan
The famous Risotto Alla Milanese gets its golden hue from the precious spice saffron. Legend has it that the dish came about when a Milanese painter decided to gild the risotto served at his wedding banquet with a harmless gold-colored dye. In Milan, they traditionally serve Risotto Alla Milanese with ossobuco (braised veal shank).
Traditionally made with raisins and candied citron, or with a creamy cream filling, the light, fluffy brioche-like bread called panettone may be tall or short, covered with chocolate or flavored with various liquors, but it’s always a symbol of the Christmas season.
With its hallmark domed shape, panettone graced Christmas tables in Milan since at least the 15th-century. Common knowledge claims its invention is from Milan. It is the most famous Christmas Lombardia food.

The Pax side of the Moon featuring Cesareo
Lombardia (Dicon tutti che sei mia) Quarantine Version - feat. Cesareo (Quarantine Version)

Music
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